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2017 Faculty Recognition Awards

Wilder School Dean John Accordino, Ph.D. with (from left), Hayley Cleary, Ph.D., Criminal Justice, Excellence in Scholarship; Shajuana Isom-Payne, director of student success, Professionalism Award; Susan Gooden, Ph.D., Public Administration, Excellence in Mentoring; and Maureen Moslow-Benway, HSEP. Not pictured, Mark Christie, Public Policy and Administration, Distinguished Adjunct award.
Wilder School Dean John Accordino, Ph.D. with (from left), Hayley Cleary, Ph.D., Criminal Justice, Excellence in Scholarship; Shajuana Isom-Payne, director of student success, Professionalism Award; Susan Gooden, Ph.D., Public Administration, Excellence in Mentoring; and Maureen Moslow-Benway, HSEP. Not pictured, Mark Christie, Public Policy and Administration, Distinguished Adjunct award.

Five Wilder School faculty have been honored for their outstanding work and commitment to students.

“These faculty members exemplify the Wilder School’s commitment to academic excellence and community engagement, and we are proud of their dedication to our students,” said Wilder School Dean John Accordino, Ph.D., FAICP. “Their professionalism and devotion to learning are inspiring.”

The 2017 Faculty Recognition Awards were presented during a faculty meeting on April 3. This year’s recipients are:

  • Maureen Moslow-Benway, Excellence in Teaching. Moslow-Benway is an instructor in the Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness program. Her teaching philosophy is to develop global citizens who are able to think critically, communicate effectively, work collaboratively with diverse populations, and possess the knowledge and skills to be effective homeland security professionals. Her engaged style and dedication to her students’ success is evident through her evaluations, where students have called her the “most influential educator,” “a brilliant professor (and) amazing human being” and “an insightful teacher and mentor.”
  • Hayley Cleary, Ph.D., Excellence in Scholarship. Cleary is an assistant professor in the Criminal Justice program. Her research focuses on police interviewing and interrogation of juveniles and the related issues of methods of ascertaining facts, police training, due process, juvenile corrections and sex offender registration. Since joining the faculty, she has generated nine published in press or forthcoming peer-reviewed works as sole or primary author. She is frequently invited to lecture at universities and local, state and federal agencies. Her research has been featured in The New York Times.
  • Shajuana Isom-Payne, Professionalism Award. Isom-Payne is director of the Office of Student Success, which she has transformed since coming to the Wilder School 1 ½ years ago. Her enthusiastic commitment to a high level of professionalism, integrity and ethical behavior complements her collaborative leadership style and is easily witnessed by those in and outside of the university. Through her efforts, the Wilder School is continually increasing opportunities for career development, internships and student-centered events.
  • Mark Christie, Distinguished Adjunct. Christie has taught in the Wilder School’s doctoral program as an adjunct since 2000. He has also assisted in the comprehensive exam process, working with students individually and helping them prepare for the exam. Students describe him as a “gifted lecturer,” “passionate” and “engaging,” and say they were “grateful,” “fortunate” and ”privileged” to have him as a teacher.
  • Susan Gooden, Ph.D., Excellence in Mentoring. Gooden is professor of public administration and policy, teaching in the graduate program. Graduate students conduct both the nomination and selection of the mentoring award. In choosing her, they stated, “Dr. Gooden possesses many characteristics that make her the best kind of mentor—the most crucial is expecting the best out of her students. Dr. Gooden sets high standards for her protégés and individually works with them to cultivate the skills necessary to reach their fullest potential.” She strives to develop public administration and policy students into the leaders of tomorrow.